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Angolan contracts and work permits

Expats looking to work in Angola will need a contract in advance to secure a work visa. Investors and business prospectors have separate visa categories and requirements.

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Work permits in Angola are granted to foreign workers through applications made by state-run institutions and private companies. Following this, with a valid work visa, expats can exit and re-enter the country on multiple occasions during a twelve month period. The work permit only allows for employment in the specific role for which it was issued, so expats cannot seek other employment without re-application.

Angola’s General Labour Act provides various protections to employees, such as the right to maternity and other forms of leave. Workers are entitled to collective bargaining rights and the right to strike.

For contracts of indefinite duration, Angolan labour law provides for a probationary period (up to six months), during which the employer, or employee, can decide to terminate the contract without prior notification or justification. Appeals can be brought to a labour court in the event of a dispute.

It is the responsibility of the employer to notify the Angolan authorities of any changes to the duration of the contract, or the termination (mutual or otherwise) of employment. This will affect expats’ visa status, so they should be careful not to overstay or risk large fines and problems gaining future entry to Angola.

Details of relevant work visa procedures can be found in our visas and permits section.

Work permits in Angola are granted to foreign workers through applications made by state-run institutions and private companies. Following this, with a valid work visa, expats can exit and re-enter the country on multiple occasions during a twelve month period. The work permit only allows for employment in the specific role for which it was issued, so expats cannot seek other employment without re-application.

Angola’s General Labour Act provides various protections to employees, such as the right to maternity and other forms of leave. Workers are entitled to collective bargaining rights and the right to strike.

For contracts of indefinite duration, Angolan labour law provides for a probationary period (up to six months), during which the employer, or employee, can decide to terminate the contract without prior notification or justification. Appeals can be brought to a labour court in the event of a dispute.

It is the responsibility of the employer to notify the Angolan authorities of any changes to the duration of the contract, or the termination (mutual or otherwise) of employment. This will affect expats’ visa status, so they should be careful not to overstay or risk large fines and problems gaining future entry to Angola.

Details of relevant work visa procedures can be found in our visas and permits section.

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